Despite Kunduz Tragedy, U.S. Must Resist Impulse to Abandon Afghanistan

An Afghan boy is fed as he recovers at a Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) hospital in Kunduz province, north of Kabul, Afghanistan, May 20, 2015 (AP photo by Rahmat Gul).
An Afghan boy is fed as he recovers at a Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) hospital in Kunduz province, north of Kabul, Afghanistan, May 20, 2015 (AP photo by Rahmat Gul).
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In the wake of the U.S. bombing of a hospital in Kunduz, there is a natural inclination to be critical of the entire U.S. military endeavor in Afghanistan. There is an even more natural inclination to want the United States to pull back from the fight there. But we should also interrogate such impulses: Is that policy best for the United States or even best for Afghanistan? Coming from me that might surprise some people. I have often harshly criticized the apparent reflex among some Washington pundits and policymakers to embrace the use of military force as a panacea to […]

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