South Sudan’s Unity Government Struggles to Silence the Guns

Military cadets march at a training center in Owiny Ki-Bul, South Sudan, June 27, 2020 (AP photo by Maura Ajak).
Military cadets march at a training center in Owiny Ki-Bul, South Sudan, June 27, 2020 (AP photo by Maura Ajak).
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It’s been two years since South Sudan’s leaders signed an agreement to end a crippling five-year civil war that killed almost 400,000 people and displaced millions, yet peace remains elusive. The country is reeling from escalating communal violence and a deepening humanitarian crisis, made worse by an ongoing political stalemate. In February, President Salva Kiir swore in opposition leader Riek Machar to once again serve as his deputy in a unity government, providing a glimmer of hope that the war-torn nation might turn a corner. It was the latest attempt for the two leaders to share power, after the last […]

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