Democracy Delayed, Domestic Uncertainty Continues to Haunt Thailand

Democracy Delayed, Domestic Uncertainty Continues to Haunt Thailand
Thailand's Crown Prince Maha Vajiralongkorn hosts a ceremony at Ratchapakdi Park in Hua Hin, south of Bangkok, Thailand, Sept. 26, 2015 (AP photo by Mark Baker).

Nearly a year and a half since a bloodless coup brought a military junta to power in Thailand for the 12th time in its history, the Southeast Asian country remains mired in uncertainty, with its political outlook hanging in the balance and its economy deeply troubled. Politically, the transition back to an elected government that the generals had promised is nowhere in sight. In May 2014, just a week after the coup, Prime Minister Prayut Chan-o-cha declared in his first public address that the ruling junta would move toward elections in a year and three months. But that deadline has […]

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