Delays Are the Least of Somalia’s Election Troubles

A woman shouts slogan during an electoral rally, Mogadishu, Somalia, Aug. 9, 2012 (AP photo by Farah Abdi Warsameh).
A woman shouts slogan during an electoral rally, Mogadishu, Somalia, Aug. 9, 2012 (AP photo by Farah Abdi Warsameh).
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Voting has finally begun for the upper and lower houses of Somalia’s Federal Parliament after several delays. While both houses are due to elect a new president on Nov. 30, security and logistical challenges mean the presidential election is also likely to be postponed. In an email interview, Kenneth Menkhaus, a professor at Davidson College, discusses Somalia’s elections. WPR: How are Somalia’s elections structured, in terms of eligible voters, candidates, political parties and affiliation, and what are the major blocs or factions contesting the election? Kenneth Menkhaus: Somalia’s current elections are most accurately described as a form of indirect consociational […]

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