Victims of the Balkans Wars Are Still Seeking Justice

Women who lost family members at Srebrenica watch a TV broadcast of the sentencing of Radovan Karadzic at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, in Tuzla, Bosnia, March, 24, 2016 (AP photo by Amel Emric).
Women who lost family members at Srebrenica watch a TV broadcast of the sentencing of Radovan Karadzic at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia, in Tuzla, Bosnia, March, 24, 2016 (AP photo by Amel Emric).
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Editor’s Note: This article contains descriptions of wartime violence and rape. PRISTINA—It’s a cold morning in Rance, a mountainous village east of Kosovo’s capital, Pristina, and Isak Asllani is preparing to pay tribute at a memorial for his fallen family and friends. It is a painful ritual he carries out every Feb. 17 to mark the anniversary of Kosovo’s declaration of independence in 2008, and the end of decades of conflict in the former Yugoslavia. Asllani was 40 years old in May 1998, when he decided to join the Kosovo Liberation Army, the ethnic Albanian, separatist guerilla group that fought […]

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