Deadly Floods in Sudan Are Another Threat to Its Transitional Government

A man wades through a flooded road in the town of Shaqilab, Sudan, Aug. 31, 2020 (AP photo by Marwan Ali).
A man wades through a flooded road in the town of Shaqilab, Sudan, Aug. 31, 2020 (AP photo by Marwan Ali).

Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. Facing record floods that have killed more than 100 people and displaced tens of thousands more, Sudan’s government just declared a three-month state of emergency. Already contending with COVID-19 and a flailing economy, a faltering response to this natural disaster threatens to further destabilize the country’s fragile transitional government. Unusually heavy seasonal rains across the region have caused the Nile River to rise nearly six feet in some parts of Sudan and brought floodwaters to 16 of the country’s 18 states. At […]

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