Deadly Protests in Bangladesh Reflect Unfinished Business

Deadly Protests in Bangladesh Reflect Unfinished Business

In Bangladesh, daily protests over war crimes tribunals are turning deadly. Thirteen people have died as thousands have demonstrated against what is perceived as a culture of impunity for war crimes allegedly committed during Bangladesh's 1971 war of independence from Pakistan.

Demonstrations have intensified since they began 10 days ago, after Abdul Quader Mollah, a leader of the Islamist party Jamaat-e-Islami, was convicted of war crimes and sentenced to life in prison. Many protesters see the life sentence as too lenient and are demanding the death penalty for Mollah.

Meanwhile, as the government continues to prosecute defendants accused of committing rape, murder and other atrocities during the 1971 war, there are concerns that a process intended to deliver justice could instead lead to a dangerous settling of scores.

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