Cutting U.S. Funding for AFRICOM Is a Losing Proposition

U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at a joint press conference with Ethiopian Foreign Minister Gedu Andargachew, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Feb. 18, 2020 (Pool AFP photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds via AP).
U.S. Secretary of State Mike Pompeo at a joint press conference with Ethiopian Foreign Minister Gedu Andargachew, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia, Feb. 18, 2020 (Pool AFP photo by Andrew Caballero-Reynolds via AP).

If there is one good foreign policy decision Congress has made over any other in the past 20 years, it is arguably its investment in building up the U.S. Africa Command, or AFRICOM. All but shutting down AFRICOM, which the Trump administration is considering, would be one of the worst decisions it could make this year, although it’s a crowded field. Which is why it was heartening when reports surfaced this week that those mooted Pentagon plans are meeting with strong headwinds in Congress. As always with the Trump White House, it’s anyone’s guess whether logic will ultimately prevail or […]

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