Corruption Hampers Nigeria’s Efforts to Fight Climate Change

Men walk past an abandoned illegal oil refinery, Bayelsa, Nigeria, May 18, 2013 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).
Men walk past an abandoned illegal oil refinery, Bayelsa, Nigeria, May 18, 2013 (AP photo by Sunday Alamba).

Editor’s note: This article is part of an ongoing WPR series on countries’ risk exposure, contribution and response to climate change. The United Nations recently warned Nigeria that climate change could threaten the government’s agricultural diversification efforts, and that extreme weather events are likely to increase, leading to reduced crop yields and disruptions in food distribution. In an email interview, Matthew Page, a consultant and co-author of the forthcoming “Nigeria: What Everyone Needs to Know,” discusses Nigeria’s climate change policy. WPR: What is Nigeria’s risk exposure to climate change, what effects of climate change are already apparent, and what sorts […]

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