Congo’s New Cabinet Raises Fears That Kabila Is Still Really in Charge

Congo’s New Cabinet Raises Fears That Kabila Is Still Really in Charge
Congolese President Felix Tshisekedi, left, and his predecessor, Joseph Kabila, during the presidential inauguration ceremony in Kinshasa, Democratic Republic of the Congo, Jan. 24, 2019 (AP photo by Jerome Delay).

Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. Eight months after his contested election, the president of the Democratic Republic of Congo, Felix Tshisekedi, finally has a Cabinet. But the list of new ministers released Monday has done little to dissuade critics who allege that Tshisekedi only won the election last December thanks to the intervention of his predecessor, Joseph Kabila, who had held onto power for years, subverting the constitution. Of the 65 positions in the new Cabinet, 42 are drawn from Kabila’s coalition, including plum roles running the […]

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