Competition With China Shouldn’t Dictate U.S. Foreign Policy

Then-Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the U.S.-China Climate Leaders Summit in Los Angeles, Sept. 16, 2015 (AP photo by Kelvin Kuo).
Then-Vice President Joe Biden speaks at the U.S.-China Climate Leaders Summit in Los Angeles, Sept. 16, 2015 (AP photo by Kelvin Kuo).
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One of former President Donald Trump’s principal legacies was to elevate the attention that U.S. foreign policy accords to China. His administration argued that America’s erstwhile “engage but hedge” approach had failed and that it was time to take a tougher line. The results of his policies, though, suggest that adopting an overly China-centric U.S. foreign policy is mistaken. Listen to this article: [soundcloud]993031504[/soundcloud] Pursuant to its more confrontational approach, the Trump administration imposed steep tariffs on Chinese exports and, having concluded that Beijing’s technological progress posed a particularly pressing threat to U.S. national security, took a number of steps […]

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