Climate Change Driving Farmer-Herder Conflict in Niger River Basin

Fishermen on the Niger River, Mali, Jan. 4, 2007 (photo by Flickr user Carsten ten Brink licensed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).
Fishermen on the Niger River, Mali, Jan. 4, 2007 (photo by Flickr user Carsten ten Brink licensed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).

West Africa’s Niger River Basin has been the location of many high-profile conflicts in recent years, including the decades-long violence in the river’s delta region and the Boko Haram insurgency in Nigeria, and another Islamist insurgency in neighboring Mali. However, another form of conflict has also gripped the region: Violence between farmers and herders has already killed over 1,000 people this year in Nigeria alone, according to Human Rights Watch, and it is increasing. At the root of many such incidents is the issue of access to land and water resources. In the western Sahel region, climate and demographic changes […]

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