Can Tsai Deliver on Taiwan Elections’ Progressive Promise?

Supporters of Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party as Tsai Ing-wen declares victory in the presidential election, Taipei, Taiwan, Jan. 15, 2016 (AP photo by Wally Santana).
Supporters of Taiwan's Democratic Progressive Party as Tsai Ing-wen declares victory in the presidential election, Taipei, Taiwan, Jan. 15, 2016 (AP photo by Wally Santana).
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The results of Taiwan’s presidential and legislative elections, which were held on Jan. 16, were important, and not only for its domestic politics and relations with China. For the third time in Taiwan’s history, there was a peaceful transfer of power through the ballot box, with Tsai Ying-wen of the opposition Democratic Progressive Party (DPP) beating Eric Chu of the ruling Kuomintang party (KMT) for the presidency. Tsai garnered more than 56 percent of votes cast, significantly more than what she managed in her last presidential bid in 2012, when she finished with just over 45 percent. For the first […]

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