Can the U.N. Afford the Cost of Post-Conflict ‘Success’ in Syria?

U.N. Special Envoy for Syria Staffan de Mistura after briefing the Security Council, Geneva, Switzerland, Feb. 26, 2016 (U.N. photo by Jean-Marc Ferné).
U.N. Special Envoy for Syria Staffan de Mistura after briefing the Security Council, Geneva, Switzerland, Feb. 26, 2016 (U.N. photo by Jean-Marc Ferné).
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The United Nations faces two nightmare scenarios in Syria, and U.N. officials have little or no power to choose between them. In one scenario, the current cessation of hostilities between the regime and rebels will break down irrevocably in the coming weeks or months, unleashing a new spiral of killing. That would instigate furious fights inside the Security Council and leave U.N. mediators with no cards left to play. In the second scenario, the cessation of hostilities, which has been in place for 10 days despite multiple violations, could prove to be more durable than most observers expected. That might […]

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