Can the Laws of War Adapt to a World of Drone Warfare?

An unmanned U.S. Predator drone, Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan, Jan. 31, 2010 (AP photo by Kirsty Wigglesworth).
An unmanned U.S. Predator drone, Kandahar Air Field, southern Afghanistan, Jan. 31, 2010 (AP photo by Kirsty Wigglesworth).
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Drones have captured the imagination of popular culture and the attention of international law experts. Amazing access to real-time intelligence enables precision weaponry, but the same information can inhibit decision-makers from acting by raising the ethical and political costs of doing so. Legal scholars concede that international law has not yet caught up with this reality. The anguish that drones cause among decision-makers is the subject of the new movie “Eye in the Sky.” It focuses in particular on how the same data that make drones such potent weapons can paradoxically inhibit, even paralyze authorities who make life-and-death decisions. The […]

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