Can Mali’s Protests End Keita’s Hold on Power?

Protesters demanding President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita’s resignation in Bamako, Mali, June 19, 2020 (AP photo by Baba Ahmed).
Protesters demanding President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita’s resignation in Bamako, Mali, June 19, 2020 (AP photo by Baba Ahmed).
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Editor’s Note: Every Friday, Andrew Green curates the top news and analysis from and about the African continent. President Ibrahim Boubacar Keita’s hold on power in Mali appears to be slipping as he struggles to quell rising protests over perceived corruption, contested parliamentary elections and his administration’s failure to suppress a years-long jihadist insurgency. A new coalition of the political opposition and civil society groups, led by an influential Muslim cleric, Mahmoud Dicko, began organizing the demonstrations last month in the capital, Bamako. The protests have grown increasingly violent, culminating in three days of clashes between demonstrators and security forces […]

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