Buyer Beware: The Pitfalls of an Economics-Driven U.S. Foreign Policy

U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses reporters about the Iran nuclear deal in the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C., Sept. 9, 2015 (U.S. State Department photo).
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry addresses reporters about the Iran nuclear deal in the U.S. Capitol, Washington, D.C., Sept. 9, 2015 (U.S. State Department photo).

The lingering misgivings among some in the U.S. Congress about the nuclear agreement with Iran have already generated calls for new sanctions against Iran, just as Tehran and many of its trading partners are gearing up for a post-sanctions environment, with corporate leaders booking flights to scope out prospects for trade and investment. Meanwhile sanctions against Russia for its seizure of Crimea continue to disrupt economic relations between Russia and major European countries, costing the latter tens of billions of euros in lost trade. The widespread use of sanctions speaks to the more prominent role of economics in foreign policymaking, […]

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