Burma, N. Korea Rekindle Diplomatic Relations After Years of Quiet Cooperation

Burma, N. Korea Rekindle Diplomatic Relations After Years of Quiet Cooperation

BANGKOK, Thailand -- The rekindling of formal diplomatic relations between Burma and North Korea this week completes a bizarre circle of skulduggery between two pariah states.

The visit by Pyongyang's deputy foreign minister, Kim Yong-Il, to Rangoon and the half-built new capital Naypyidaw is a formality, and certainly not the first visit by North Koreans since relations were formally severed in 1983.

There have been persistent reports in recent years of North Korean technicians working in Burma, including isolated Naypyidaw -- which means the abode of kings -- 200 miles north of the old capital of Rangoon, a nine-hour train journey.

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