Brazil Plane Crash Spawns Two-Woman Presidential Race

Brazilian Socialist Party presidential candidate Marina Silva speaks to the press after attending mass in honor of late presidential candidate Eduardo Campos at the Metropolitan Cathedral in Brasilia, Brazil, Aug. 19, 2014 (AP photo by Eraldo Peres).
Brazilian Socialist Party presidential candidate Marina Silva speaks to the press after attending mass in honor of late presidential candidate Eduardo Campos at the Metropolitan Cathedral in Brasilia, Brazil, Aug. 19, 2014 (AP photo by Eraldo Peres).

The life story of Brazil’s Marina Silva is so unlikely that she explains key moments as the result of divine intervention. Among the most dramatic and potentially life-changing of all the unlikely turns came last week, when a private plane in which she was supposed to be traveling crashed, killing Socialist Party presidential candidate Eduardo Campos and suddenly turning her into a formidable contender for the presidency of Brazil. Silva, a charismatic environmental activist and former environment minister with an ideology that does not fit neatly into any single current, was Campos’ running mate on the Socialist Party ticket for […]

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