Will Burundi’s Disputed Election Mark a New Chapter or a Return to Violence?

Supporters of the ruling party gather for the start of the election campaign, Bugendana, Burundi (AP photo by Berthier Mugiraneza).
Supporters of the ruling party gather for the start of the election campaign, Bugendana, Burundi (AP photo by Berthier Mugiraneza).

OUAGADOUGOU, Burkina Faso—Burundi’s ruling party celebrated Monday after its candidate, Evariste Ndayishimiye, was declared the winner of last week’s presidential election. But the leading opposition party says it will contest the results, prompting fears of a return to the violence that plagued the country after President Pierre Nkurunziza’s disputed reelection in 2015, which sparked widespread protests that were met with a government crackdown. Since then, at least 1,200 people have been killed in intermittent clashes with security forces, while 400,000 have been forced to flee the country. Burundi’s election commission announced that Ndayishimiye won handily, with nearly 69 percent of […]

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