Bolivia’s Morales Set to Ride Pragmatic Populism to Landslide

Bolivian President Evo Morales waves to the crowd during the closing campaign rally in El Alto, Bolivia, Oct. 8, 2014 (AP photo by Juan Karita).
Bolivian President Evo Morales waves to the crowd during the closing campaign rally in El Alto, Bolivia, Oct. 8, 2014 (AP photo by Juan Karita).
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Editor’s Note: This is the first of a two-part briefing on Bolivia’s presidential election. Part I looks at domestic issues contributing to President Evo Morales’ success. Part II will examine the regional significance of the Morales model of governance. Unlike elections in neighboring Brazil and Uruguay, Bolivia’s presidential race is notably lacking in drama and suspense in the run-up to voting on Oct. 12. Despite some constitutional questions surrounding his candidacy and criticisms over how much power he has amassed, President Evo Morales appears headed for a landslide victory that would make him not only Bolivia’s longest-serving president, but the […]

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