Biden’s Review of Drone Strikes Is a Chance to Reject ‘Targeted Killings’

An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, in southern Afghanistan, Jan. 31, 2010 (AP photo by Kirsty Wigglesworth).
An unmanned U.S. Predator drone flies over Kandahar Air Field, in southern Afghanistan, Jan. 31, 2010 (AP photo by Kirsty Wigglesworth).
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On its first day in office, the Biden administration quietly placed temporary limits on counterterrorism drone strikes outside of active battlefields. According to the New York Times, which first broke the news last week, the new restrictions are intended as a stopgap while Biden’s national security team conducts a broader review of U.S. counterterrorism operations overseas—including whether to reverse policies put in place by the Trump administration that expanded the use of drone strikes. In light of the Biden administration’s more cautious stance on drone strikes and its renewed focus on multilateralism, some analysts have argued the U.S. should be […]

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