Behind the Headlines of Saudi Reform, a Push for Public Accountability

Muslim pilgrims walk toward the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 13, 2015 (AP photo by Mosa'ab Elshamy).
Muslim pilgrims walk toward the Grand Mosque in the holy city of Mecca, Saudi Arabia, Sept. 13, 2015 (AP photo by Mosa'ab Elshamy).

RIYADH, Saudi Arabia—Since ascending to the Saudi throne in January 2015, King Salman has launched a range of reform initiatives. One of the more radical, but least sign-posted, is a drive for greater accountability and transparency in public life. Saudi commentators believe the move is aimed in part at cutting the ground out from under the scores of critics on social media who accuse senior Saudi officials and members of the royal family of pocketing a large share of the country’s huge oil revenue. The initiative may also be intended to compensate for the absence of political reform in the […]

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