Attack on Aid Workers in South Sudan Was an Attack on Humanitarianism Itself

Civilians sheltered in a United Nations base in Juba manned by Chinese peacekeepers, South Sudan, July 25, 2016 (AP photo by Jason Patinkin).
Civilians sheltered in a United Nations base in Juba manned by Chinese peacekeepers, South Sudan, July 25, 2016 (AP photo by Jason Patinkin).

In August, reports emerged that South Sudanese soldiers had violently attacked foreign aid workers during a July rampage in the capital, Juba. They took hostages and raped several women at a hotel popular with foreigners, and also killed a local journalist. During the four-hour siege, those held captive at the Terrain Hotel repeatedly called for help to the United Nations peacekeeping force—stationed less than a mile down the road—and the U.S. embassy in Juba, but none came. Beyond the horrible violence the hostages endured, the attack reflected a litany of systemic failures to safeguard foreign aid workers who seem to […]

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