As Ukraine Looks West, EU Seeks Russia Accommodation

Ukrainian then-President-elect Petro Poroshenko and Russian President Vladimir Putin Ouistreham, France, June 6, 2014 (AP photo by Christophe Ena, Pool).
Ukrainian then-President-elect Petro Poroshenko and Russian President Vladimir Putin Ouistreham, France, June 6, 2014 (AP photo by Christophe Ena, Pool).
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After the end of the Cold War, there was a palpable sense of optimism that the Euro-Atlantic community could be expanded at little risk and without significant cost. It was assumed that Russia would either itself seek to join the West or be too weak to oppose the process if it soured on the project. U.S. and European policymakers, however, had not considered the possibility of a Russia both hostile to Western expansion and with sufficient strength to stymie such plans. Now the unfolding end game in Ukraine is challenging the core assumptions of European security that have guided policymakers […]

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