As the U.N. Tries to Push Colombia’s Peace Process Along, Is Time Running Out?

U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, left, and Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos shake hands as they pose for photos at the presidential palace, Bogota, Colombia, Jan. 13, 2018 (AP photo by Fernando Vergara).
U.N. Secretary-General Antonio Guterres, left, and Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos shake hands as they pose for photos at the presidential palace, Bogota, Colombia, Jan. 13, 2018 (AP photo by Fernando Vergara).

Last weekend, United Nations Secretary-General Antonio Guterres traveled to Colombia to try to invigorate the 2016 peace agreement ending a relentless guerrilla insurgency that had become a painful relic of the Cold War. The longest-running armed conflict in the Western hemisphere pitted the state against the Marxist Revolutionary Armed Forces of Colombia, or FARC, the largest of two Marxist guerrilla groups that battled Colombian forces for more than half a century. But in contrast to the international acclaim and optimism that greeted the peace deal, which culminated in Colombian President Juan Manuel Santos receiving the 2016 Nobel Peace Prize, Guterres’ […]

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