As Sharing Apps Spread, Uber Becomes Global Political ‘Hot Potato’

As Sharing Apps Spread, Uber Becomes Global Political ‘Hot Potato’
Taxi drivers protest the Uber ride service, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, Nov. 11, 2015 (AP photo by Leo Correa).

What global phenomenon has emerged as a pressing dilemma for politicians from Mumbai to Montevideo, from Tuscaloosa to Fukuoka? It’s not climate change, ideological extremism or economic inequality. No, it’s Uber. The overwhelmingly successful ride-sharing app is spreading its disruptive technology rapidly across the planet, creating a political crisis wherever it goes in the process. Uber has become a test of loyalties for elected officials torn between important segments of their constituencies, as well as a challenge to their political skills and a complicated experiment revealing their views about the role of government in society. At the same time, it […]

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