As Russia Confronts Pension Shortfall, Some Advocate More Aggressive Investment of State Funds

As Russia Confronts Pension Shortfall, Some Advocate More Aggressive Investment of State Funds

MOSCOW -- After 26 years of serving as a captain in the Soviet Army, Nikolai Petrovich never imagined he'd be selling mushrooms past dark on a cold Moscow street corner.

Petrovich, 75, says he remains a fervent supporter of President Vladimir Putin and that his $350 monthly pension check would normally suffice, if not for price hikes that have made this capital the most expensive in the world.

"The government gives me some money, but prices have gone up so much, it's not enough," he says. "We must make some extra on our own."

Keep reading for free!

Get instant access to the rest of this article by submitting your email address below. You'll also get access to three articles of your choice each month and our free newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having a personal curator and expert analyst of global affairs news. Subscribe now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of tens of thousands of articles.
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday.
  • Regular in-depth articles with deep dives into important issues and countries.
  • The Daily Review email, with our take on the day’s most important news, the latest WPR analysis, what’s on our radar, and more.
  • The Weekly Review email, with quick summaries of the week’s most important coverage, and what’s to come.
  • Completely ad-free reading.

And all of this is available to you when you subscribe today.