As a Nonproliferation Agreement, the Iran Deal Has Been a Success

Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and the head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, at a ceremony marking the national day of nuclear technology, Tehran, April 7, 2016 (Iranian Presidency Office via AP).
Iranian President Hassan Rouhani and the head of Iran's Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, at a ceremony marking the national day of nuclear technology, Tehran, April 7, 2016 (Iranian Presidency Office via AP).
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July 14 was the first anniversary of the historic nuclear accord between Iran and the group of world powers known as the P5+1—the U.S., China, Russia, France, the United Kingdom and Germany. For the first time, the deal put in place significant curbs on Iran’s nuclear program in exchange for relief from crippling international sanctions. The deal, and its subsequent implementation so far, have been hailed by a wide number of national security luminaries, nuclear nonproliferation analysts and the vast majority of the global community. But opposition to it, particularly among foreign policy hawks in the United States, Israel and […]

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