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The New Rules: Globalization, Air Hubs and the City of Tomorrow

Monday, Dec. 6, 2010

H.G. Wells' futuristic 1933 classic, "The Shape of Things of Come," predicted a post-apocalyptic world in which humanity's recovery would depend on the airplane as the primary mechanism for both travel and political rule -- the benevolent "dictatorship of the air." The book reflected Wells' prescient fears of catastrophic world war and his faith in technology's capacity to tame mankind's worst instincts.

A book due out in March entitled, "Aerotropolis: The Way We'll Live Next," is the closest thing to a real-world vision to rival that of Wells. The book, written by journalist Greg Lindsay, is based on the visionary ideas of business professor John Kasarda, a latter-day Wells who dreams of building future cities around airports instead of the other way around. ...

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