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Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov and Indian Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar in New Delhi, India Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov, left, and Indian Foreign Minister Subrahmanyam Jaishankar following their talks in New Delhi, India, April 6, 2021 (Russian Foreign Ministry Press Service photo via AP Images).

Russia and India Still Have a Lot to Offer Each Other

Friday, June 25, 2021

In late April, India and Russia announced the establishment of a “2+2” dialogue between each side’s ministers of defense and foreign affairs. Indian Prime Minister Narendra Modi tweeted at the time that this will “add further momentum to our strategic partnership.” Until recently, India had adopted this format only with Australia, Japan and the United States—the other members of the Quadrilateral Security Dialogue, better known as the Quad—while Russia has an equivalent arrangement with only a few select countries.

The announcement comes at a time when geopolitical trends, as well as consequent foreign policy adjustments in both Moscow and New Delhi, have pulled the two powers in opposite directions, raising concerns about the future of their bilateral ties. A more comprehensive dialogue mechanism like the 2+2 could stabilize relations and help prevent further ruptures. ...

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