Animosity Between Iran and Europe Could Derail Efforts to Save the Nuclear Deal

Iran’s vice president and head of its Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, Nov. 26, 2018 (AP photo by Francisco Seco).
Iran’s vice president and head of its Atomic Energy Organization, Ali Akbar Salehi, at the European Commission headquarters in Brussels, Belgium, Nov. 26, 2018 (AP photo by Francisco Seco).

Relations between Iran and the European Union seemed to enjoy something of a honeymoon just after President Donald Trump announced he was pulling the United States out of the 2015 agreement limiting Tehran’s nuclear program. But it is becoming increasingly evident that any warm feelings engendered by a joint commitment to preserve the Iran deal and stand against Trump have cooled significantly. Europe and Iran are now growing farther apart amid accusations that the Islamic Republic is engaging in behavior that Europe cannot countenance. The nuclear deal itself could ultimately collapse in the acrimony. Last May, when Trump announced the […]

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