Angola Prepares for Life After Dos Santos

Angolans on a beach during the African Cup of Nations soccer tournament, Benguela, Angola, Jan. 17, 2010 (AP photo by Themba Hadebe).
Angolans on a beach during the African Cup of Nations soccer tournament, Benguela, Angola, Jan. 17, 2010 (AP photo by Themba Hadebe).

After sending signals of his plans to retire from politics for nearly a year, Angola’s president, Jose Eduardo dos Santos—the second-longest-ruling leader in Africa—announced earlier this month that he will step down at the end of his current mandate and not run in August elections. That will bring an end to a presidency that began in 1979, when Jimmy Carter was in the White House. The transition from dos Santos’ rule is the most significant political event in Angola since its independence from Portugal in 1974, and comes at a time of deep economic and social crisis in the oil-rich […]

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