Accountability for Mexico’s Ayotzinapa Massacre Won’t Come Easy

Accountability for Mexico’s Ayotzinapa Massacre Won’t Come Easy
Family members and friends participate in a march seeking justice for the missing 43 Ayotzinapa students in Mexico City, Aug. 26, 2022 (AP photo by Marco Ugarte).

On Aug. 18, nearly eight years after 43 students from a teacher’s college in the rural town of Ayotzinapa disappeared, a truth commission set up by the government released a sprawling report that confirmed what many had long argued: The state was involved. But whether the findings will result in accountability remains to be seen.

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