America’s Four Most Problematic Security Partners and What to Do About Them

U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan after a bilateral meeting, Paris, France, Dec. 1, 2015 (AP photo by Yasin Bulbul).
U.S. President Barack Obama shakes hands with Turkish President Recep Tayyip Erdogan after a bilateral meeting, Paris, France, Dec. 1, 2015 (AP photo by Yasin Bulbul).
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When the next U.S. president takes office in 2017, he or she will move into the White House with a long national security to-do list. One of the most pressing items will be to assess America’s security partnerships, particularly the problematic ones, to decide which can be repaired, which must be tolerated as is, and which should be abandoned. Four partnerships will top the reassessment list: Egypt, Saudi Arabia, Pakistan and Turkey. Each has a longstanding relationship with the United States harkening back to the Cold War. All four became even more important after the Sept. 11 attacks on the […]

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