America’s Biggest National Security Threats Are at Home, Not Abroad

People stand outside as parishioners leave the Emanuel A.M.E. Church, Charleston, S.C., June 21, 2015 (AP photo by Stephen B. Morton).
People stand outside as parishioners leave the Emanuel A.M.E. Church, Charleston, S.C., June 21, 2015 (AP photo by Stephen B. Morton).
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There are so many depressing realities underscored by the tragic shooting deaths of nine African-American parishioners in the Emanuel AME Church in Charleston, it’s hard to know where to begin: from the seeming permanence of America’s glaring racial divide to the country’s inability to stanch the unceasing carnage of gun violence that is unlike that of any other country in the world. But here’s one that will be self-evident to most foreign policy observers: If the gunman in Charleston had been not white, but Arab, and if he had yelled “Allahu akbar,” rather than uttering racist statements, we wouldn’t be […]

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