After Zuma, a New Start for South Africa Will Be Easier Said Than Done

South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, center with black cap, goes for a walk with members of the public, Cape Town, South Africa, Feb. 20, 2018 (AP photo).
South African President Cyril Ramaphosa, center with black cap, goes for a walk with members of the public, Cape Town, South Africa, Feb. 20, 2018 (AP photo).

When Jacob Zuma formally resigned as South Africa’s president last week, some commentators used his overdue but less than gracious exit as an opportunity to reach for the famous words of U.S. President Gerald Ford, who in 1974 declared, in the wake of Richard Nixon’s resignation, that “our long national nightmare is over.” Those words capture both the widespread sense of disgust in South Africa at the malignant nature of the Zuma presidency, and the hope for a new beginning and a fresh start under Cyril Ramaphosa. The new president has chosen his words carefully so far, anxious not to […]

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