Cote d’Ivoire’s Post-Election Political Crisis Shows Little Sign of Abating

A policeman walks past a burning barricade during a protest in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, Nov. 3, 2020 (AP photo by Leo Correa).
A policeman walks past a burning barricade during a protest in Abidjan, Cote d’Ivoire, Nov. 3, 2020 (AP photo by Leo Correa).

DAKAR, Senegal—Mohammed Ouattara, an activist from Cote d’Ivoire who lives in exile in Senegal, doesn’t mince words when speaking about his country’s recent presidential elections. “It’s a constitutional coup d’état,” he told me, as we sat in a café along the corniche in Dakar. “He doesn’t have the right to be a candidate,” he said, his eyes wide and intense. “He stole the elections.” Ouattara was referring to Cote d’Ivoire’s president, Alassane Ouattara, who was reelected to a controversial third term last month in a landslide, according to election officials, although his two main opponents had boycotted the vote and […]

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