After Election Victory, Turkey’s Erdogan Unlikely to Change Ways

After Election Victory, Turkey’s Erdogan Unlikely to Change Ways
Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan acknowledges supporters after his election victory, in Ankara, Turkey, Aug. 10, 2014 (AP photo by Burhan Ozbilici).

Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan fulfilled practically everyone’s predictions by winning the country’s first direct presidential election Sunday. But rather than putting an end to the divisive political battles that have roiled the country and the inflammatory stance that has strained Turkey’s relations with neighbors, Erdogan’s victory promises to usher in yet another era of contentious domestic and international politics.

The newly elected, soon-to-be President Erdogan will start a new phase of his plan to become an even more dominant figure in Turkey’s political landscape for many more years to come. As Ian Bremmer put it on Twitter following the election, “Erdogan pleased with the Turkish presidency. But he won’t be truly satisfied until he’s Sultan.”

Bremmer was obviously using hyperbole for his 140-character analysis. But Erdogan’s blueprint for expanding his power by turning the presidency, currently a very weak position, into a powerful executive will require the kind of political machinations, bullying tactics and fiery populist rhetoric, including on foreign policy, for which he has already come to be known.

Keep reading for free!

Get instant access to the rest of this article by submitting your email address below. You'll also get access to three articles of your choice each month and our free newsletter:

Or, Subscribe now to get full access.

Already a subscriber? Log in here .

What you’ll get with an All-Access subscription to World Politics Review:

A WPR subscription is like no other resource — it’s like having a personal curator and expert analyst of global affairs news. Subscribe now, and you’ll get:

  • Immediate and instant access to the full searchable library of tens of thousands of articles.
  • Daily articles with original analysis, written by leading topic experts, delivered to you every weekday.
  • Regular in-depth articles with deep dives into important issues and countries.
  • The Daily Review email, with our take on the day’s most important news, the latest WPR analysis, what’s on our radar, and more.
  • The Weekly Review email, with quick summaries of the week’s most important coverage, and what’s to come.
  • Completely ad-free reading.

And all of this is available to you when you subscribe today.