After a Summer of Protests, Can Georgia’s Government Regain Its Lost Trust?

Opposition demonstrators hold Georgian flags and posters reading “Georgian Interior Minister Giorgi Gakharia go home” during a rally in front of the Georgian Parliament’s building in Tbilisi, Georgia, July 6, 2019 (AP photo by Shakh Aivazov).
Opposition demonstrators hold Georgian flags and posters reading “Georgian Interior Minister Giorgi Gakharia go home” during a rally in front of the Georgian Parliament’s building in Tbilisi, Georgia, July 6, 2019 (AP photo by Shakh Aivazov).
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Earlier this month, Georgia’s Parliament approved a new government led by Giorgi Gakharia, a controversial former interior minister who was nominated by the ruling Georgian Dream party despite his role in a violent crackdown on anti-government protests that rocked the capital, Tbilisi, this summer. Gakharia will now try to restore public confidence in the government ahead of parliamentary elections that are expected to be held early next year. Meanwhile, the main opposition party, the United National Movement, or UNM, also has work to do if it hopes to retake power. In an email interview with WPR, Olga Oliker and Olesya […]

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