Accusations That Macri Is Politicizing the Judiciary Raise Alarms in Argentina

Supporters of Argentina’s former president, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, chant slogans outside the court where she appeared before a judge on a corruption case, Buenos Aires, Argentina, March 7, 2017 (AP photo by Victor R. Caivano).
Supporters of Argentina’s former president, Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner, chant slogans outside the court where she appeared before a judge on a corruption case, Buenos Aires, Argentina, March 7, 2017 (AP photo by Victor R. Caivano).

Argentines watched in shock last month as former Vice President Amado Boudou was arrested and put in pre-trial detention on corruption charges. It was the latest in a string of arrests of former officials from ex-President Cristina Fernandez de Kirchner’s administration, causing many to question whether the former president, who faces indictments in several criminal cases, could be next. But although a section of Argentina’s population was elated at the media spectacle of the disheveled, barefoot vice president in handcuffs, the arrest caused journalists and politicians from across the political spectrum to question whether the judiciary is starting to abuse […]

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