Abolish DHS? Reform the Department of Homeland Security Instead

Federal officers disperse Black Lives Matter protesters near the federal courthouse in Portland, Ore., July 24, 2020 (AP photo by Noah Berger).
Federal officers disperse Black Lives Matter protesters near the federal courthouse in Portland, Ore., July 24, 2020 (AP photo by Noah Berger).

Editor’s Note: Guest columnist Steven Metz is filling in for Judah Grunstein this week. The Department of Homeland Security was created quickly in the traumatic year after the 9/11 attacks—a time when a fearful American public was desperate for anything that might make them safer. While the idea of an overarching organization to coordinate defending the U.S. homeland had floated around Washington for several years, 9/11 energized it. In November 2002, Congress passed the Homeland Security Act, combining 22 disparate federal departments and agencies linked only by their broad remit to deal with homeland security. Like many other actions undertaken […]

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