A Tale of Two Strategies: Limited War in U.S. and Russian Strategic Culture

A Tale of Two Strategies: Limited War in U.S. and Russian Strategic Culture
U.S. Secretary of State John Kerry and Russian Foreign Minister Sergey Lavrov following talks on a cease-fire in Syria, Moscow, Russia, March 24, 2016 (AP photo by Alexander Nemenov).

Since assuming power in 1999, Russian President Vladimir Putin has used rising income from gas and oil exports not only to rebuild the Russian military from its post-Soviet nadir, but also to spur the evolution of new tactics and capabilities blending cyberwar, support to proxy forces, special operations and conventional operations. Like Washington, Moscow recognized that the primary security threat in the opening decades of the 21st century was not major conventional war but a complex web of state weakness, political extremism, terrorism, insurgency and transnational crime. Russia’s military interventions in Georgia, Ukraine, Syria and elsewhere demonstrate that Putin has […]

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