A Saudi-Brokered Deal Averts Yemen’s War Within a War—for Now

Yemeni Southern Transitional Council member Nasser al-Khabji, left, and Yemen's deputy prime minister, Salem al-Khanbashi, sign a power-sharing deal in Riyadh, Nov. 5, 2019 (Saudi Royal Palace photo by Bandar Aljaloud via AP).
Yemeni Southern Transitional Council member Nasser al-Khabji, left, and Yemen's deputy prime minister, Salem al-Khanbashi, sign a power-sharing deal in Riyadh, Nov. 5, 2019 (Saudi Royal Palace photo by Bandar Aljaloud via AP).

After months of standoffs and halting negotiations, Yemen’s internationally recognized government signed a power-sharing agreement with southern separatists that, as the International Crisis Group put it, “has averted a war within Yemen’s civil war, at least for the time being.” The deal, brokered by Saudi Arabia and signed in Riyadh on Nov. 5, lays out the terms of a cessation of hostilities between President Abdrabbuh Mansour Hadi’s government and the separatist movement known as the Southern Transitional Council, or STC. Whether the agreement holds—let alone precipitates an end to Yemen’s devastating civil war and a new way forward for its […]

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