A Fragile Peace in Nagorno-Karabakh Leaves Russia and Turkey in Charge—For Now

Russian peacekeepers patrol an area in the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh, Nov. 14, 2020 (AP photo by Dmitry Lovetsky).
Russian peacekeepers patrol an area in the disputed region of Nagorno-Karabakh, Nov. 14, 2020 (AP photo by Dmitry Lovetsky).

Armenia and Azerbaijan signed an agreement last week to end six weeks of bloody fighting over the disputed enclave of Nagorno-Karabakh. The Russia-brokered deal requires Armenia to give up much of the territory it controlled prior to the recent hostilities, and calls for Moscow to maintain a peacekeeping force of just under 2,000 soldiers. The agreement was widely seen as a win for Russia, which has regained substantial influence in the South Caucasus region, and for Turkey, whose military support for Azerbaijan was critical to the gains it made on the battlefield. Western powers were largely left out in the […]

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