‘A Litany of Failed Enterprises’: Robert Malley on a Changing Middle East

Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, left, U.S. President Donald Trump and the foreign ministers from Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates after signing the Abraham Accords in Washington, Sept. 15, 2020 (AP photo by Alex Brandon).
Israeli Prime Minister Benjamin Netanyahu, left, U.S. President Donald Trump and the foreign ministers from Bahrain and the United Arab Emirates after signing the Abraham Accords in Washington, Sept. 15, 2020 (AP photo by Alex Brandon).
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Over the past 20 years, the geopolitical landscape of the Middle East has been transformed and reshaped. Old rivalries and historical enmities have hardened and deepened, driving strategic realignments and the emergence of a range of new or newly empowered actors from both within and outside the region. At the same time, political change has been harder to come by. With a few notable exceptions, waves of popular protest movements across the region in both 2011 and last year have failed to achieve the reforms and accountability they have demanded from their governments. In today’s big picture Trend Lines interview, […]

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