Pressure Mounts as Deadline for EU-Africa Trade Talks Looms

The first EU-Africa summit since 2010 was held in Brussels this month. Much of the media focus leading up to the summit was on Robert Mugabe’s failed bid to instigate a boycott of the meeting by African leaders. Beyond these headlines, however, trade relations between the two parties continue to be one of pressing importance, with negotiations for Economic Partnership Agreements one of the most divisive issues.

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U.S. Struggles to Build Coherent Response to Ugandan Anti-Gay Law

A panel discussion on Thursday organized by the Center for Human Rights and Global Justice at the NYU School of Law discussed options for U.S. policy toward Uganda, after relations were ruffled by a new Ugandan law signed in February that imposes harsh legal penalties, including life sentences, for homosexual acts. The question is whether the Obama administration can produce an effective response to the new law.

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Attacks on Rwanda’s Exiles Reveal Deeper Troubles for Kagame

By Jon Rosen
, on , Briefing

Twenty years after Rwanda’s genocide, the killing in South Africa of one opponent of President Paul Kagame and a break-in at the South Africa residence of another fit a pattern of attacks against Rwandan exiles and have exposed a sense of unease within Kagame’s government. It’s possible that cracks in his inner circle could foment more broad-based opposition and threaten the country’s post-genocide rebirth. more

Central African Republic a Crisis Too Far for Chad’s Regional Security Ambitions

By Celeste Hicks
, on , Briefing

With Chad’s April 3 announcement that it would pull its peacekeepers out of the CAR, the country finally seemed to be bending to widespread criticism of the actions of its soldiers. Things had deteriorated for Chad’s armed forces since last year, when their role in support of France’s Operation Serval in Mali was widely praised. The CAR may have forced Chad to recognize the limits of its regional ambitions. more

Aid Under Fire: Health Care and the Costs of Conflict

By Hannah Vaughan-Lee
, on , Feature

In recent years, the security threats facing humanitarian aid workers have been the subject of headlines and debates. The humanitarian advocacy community has also been filled with discussions of a perceived increase in the politicization of humanitarian aid. But the debate over violence and politicization in turn raises another important and complex question that requires greater attention: Are the costs of conflict now greater for affected populations, particularly when it comes to health? more

Kagame’s Rwanda Presents South Africa With Delicate Balancing Act

By James Hamill
, on , Briefing

Relations between South Africa and Rwanda have suffered a sharp downturn with the murder and attempted murder in South Africa of two former high-level Rwandan security officers who had fled Rwanda for South Africa. While the Rwandan regime formally denied responsibility, the attacks have poisoned bilateral relations, which had been close until South Africa began providing safe haven for Rwandan exiles. more

In Sidelining Rival, Uganda’s Museveni Might Drive Internal Challenges Underground

By Gaaki Kigambo
, on , Briefing

A recent move by Uganda’s ruling NRM party all but secured yet another opening for longtime President Yoweri Museveni to represent the party without any internal challenge in the next elections in 2016. However, instead of securing party unity and cohesion, as is hoped, the efforts to undercut a rival have the potential to drive internal dissent further underground, where it might hurt Museveni and the NRM more. more

Toxic Mix of Oil and Politics Threatens Libya’s Cohesion

By Thijs Van de Graaf
, on , Briefing

Libyan Prime Minister Ali Zeidan was removed Tuesday after failing to stop a tanker from sailing away with an illicit shipment of Libyan oil. The event underscores the crucial role of the oil industry in the country’s current political instability. Libya is now on the brink of collapse, following a pattern in which the presence of oil in ethnically divided societies spurs secessionist conflicts and civil wars. more

Global Insider: Maintaining Power-Sharing in Burundi’s Army Top Priority in Current Crisis

By The Editors
, on , Trend Lines

Authorities in Burundi are seeking the arrest of an opposition leader after clashes between opposition party members and police, deepening a political crisis sparked by proposed constitutional changes that would allow the president to run for a third term. In an email interview, Stef Vandeginste, a lecturer in governance, development and conflict at the University of Antwerp whose research focuses on Burundi, explained the factors behind the country’s worst political crisis since its 12-year civil war ended nearly a decade ago. more

Global Insider: Nigeria’s Fault Lines Inhibit Anti-Corruption Efforts

By The Editors
, on , Trend Lines

Late last month, Nigerian central bank governor Sanusi Lamido Sanusi was suspended from office after alleging that $20 billion had disappeared from the state oil company. In an email interview, Wale Adebanwi, associate professor of African American and African studies at University of California, Davis, explained the state of anti-corruption efforts in Nigeria. more

Regional Tensions Complicate South Sudan’s Crisis

By Gaaki Kigambo
, on , Briefing

The deadly conflict in South Sudan is increasingly drawing in neighboring countries driven by disparate security and economic interests, further complicating the crisis and efforts to reach a quick resolution. The U.N. has accused both sides of human rights abuses in a conflict that has so far claimed an unknown number of lives, displaced an estimated 900,000 people and shows no signs of letting up. more