A Palestinian refugee poses for a picture in front of a wall painted with a mural in the Kalandia refugee camp between Jerusalem and the West Bank city of Ramallah, June 18, 2014 (AP photo by Muhammed Muheisen).

Prisoners of Oslo: Palestine After the Peace Process

By George Hale
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Two decades after the Oslo Accords, nationhood seems more distant than ever for the Palestinians who returned to the West Bank hoping to build a new state. Reporting from Bethlehem, George Hale assesses the bleak mood of post-Oslo Palestine, where no peace with Israel is in sight.
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A woman dances to Gaga Afro-Caribbean music during a protest against racial discrimination and “denationalization” of Dominicans of Haitian descent, Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic, March 21, 2014 (AP photo by Ezequiel Abiu Lopez).

Internal Exile: The Plight of Dominicans of Haitian Descent

By Liliana Gamboa, Laura Bingham
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In 2013, a Dominican court ruled that a woman born in the country to Haitian parents in 1984 should be retroactively deprived of Dominican nationality due to her parents’ migratory status. The decision touched off a political and humanitarian crisis that stretches beyond the island nation’s borders.
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A Pakistani religious student stands before a fire set by protesters demanding the government unmask culprits of the Taliban attack on a school, Peshawar, Pakistan, Dec. 16, 2014 (AP photo by Mohammad Sajjad).

FATA: The Never-Ending War on Pakistan’s Periphery

By Asad Hashim
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The recent attack on a school in Peshawar, and the Pakistani government’s response, sum up life in the Federally Administered Tribal Areas (FATA)—a frontier region on the edge of Pakistan that has been overtaken by militants, the military and the struggle to survive in the tiny space between them.
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Brazil’s President Dilma Rousseff cries during a speech at the launching ceremony of the National Truth Commission Report in Brasilia, Dec. 10, 2014 (AP photo by Eraldo Peres).

From Amnesty to Accountability: Transitional Justice in South America

By Naomi Roht-Arriaza
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Like much of Latin America, Argentina, Chile and Brazil experienced long military dictatorships whose influence lingered even after democracy was restored. But the three have begun to pursue prosecutions and reparations that are now seen as a template for similar efforts around the world.
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Egyptian youths shout slogans against the country’s ruling military council during a demonstration in Tahrir Square in Cairo, Egypt, Nov. 30, 2011 (AP photo by Bela Szandelszky).

Down but Not Out: Youth and Revolution in Egypt and Beyond

By Thanassis Cambanis
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Young people and youthful energy propelled the Egyptian uprising that began in 2011, and they remain the Arab world’s best hope. Today the military appears to have won in Egypt, but the long-term outcome of the struggle there is still in question; how it unfolds will be a bellwether for the Arab world.
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Oil sands refinery in Fort McMurray, Alberta, Canada, Feb. 10, 2012 (photo by Flickr user kris krüg, licensed under the Attribution-NonCommercial-ShareAlike 2.0 Generic license).

Shifting Sands: How Energy Is Shaping Canada’s Foreign Policy

By Mike De Souza
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The Canadian government has been engaging in an aggressive public relations campaign for its energy industry as part of Prime Minister Stephen Harper’s declared goal of making Canada an energy superpower. In the process, Canada’s foreign policy and climate change agenda have also been transformed.
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France’s far right presidential candidate and National Front party president Marine Le Pen attends a political rally in Chateauroux, France, Feb. 26, 2012 (Sipa via AP Images).

History’s Postscript: The Populist Threat to Liberal Democracy

By Jan-Werner Müller
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Contrary to what has often been alleged, Francis Fukuyama’s argument in “The End of History” that only liberal democracy can fulfill basic human aspirations for freedom and dignity has not been so obviously disproven. But democracy does have a serious rival today: populism.
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Zimbabwean President Robert Mugabe and Chinese President Xi Jinping shake hands during a signing ceremony at the Great Hall of the People in Beijing, China, Aug. 25, 2014 (AP photo by Diego Azubel).

Adaptive Engagement: China’s Approach to Southern Africa

By Cobus van Staden
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Observers of China’s engagement with Africa often assume that Africa is passive in the relationship. A look at Mozambique, Zimbabwe and South Africa shows that the reality is more complicated: Chinese actors often try to partially adapt to specific African systems, with varying degrees of success.
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Supporters of Greece’s radical leftist party Syriza rally in Athens as European Union voters cast ballots in European Parliament elections, May 22, 2014 (Kyodo via AP Images).

Aftershocks: The Political Fallout of Greece’s Economic Crisis

By Dimitri A. Sotiropoulos
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This year, the Greek economy may finally return to growth. But while Greece is farther away from the fiscal abyss than it was four years ago, the social cost for middle- and low-income groups has been high, and political conflicts may put recent economic accomplishments at risk.
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A police officer and a soldier arrest a gang member in compliance with the government’s “Mano Dura” plan in San Salvador, El Salvador, Oct. 16, 2003 (AP photo by Victor Ruiz Caballero).

Justice Deferred: Rule of Law in Central America

By Michael Allison
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One of the primary historical causes of political violence in Central America has been the absence of democratic rule of law. Since the 1990s, reformists have mobilized to strengthen institutions in Guatemala, El Salvador and Honduras. However, these efforts have been for the most part unsuccessful.
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