Frida Ghitis

Frida Ghitis is a world affairs columnist, author and consultant.

She started her career at CNN, where she worked initially as a show producer, a unit manager for major news operations and later as a producer and correspondent covering mostly international news.

In addition to CNN, her work has appeared in the Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, NRC Handelsblad (Netherlands) and in scores of publications in the U.S., Europe, the Middle East and beyond.

Her regular column on global affairs in the Miami Herald is distributed worldwide by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. Her weekly WPR column, World Citizen, appears every Thursday.

She has worked in all corners of the world, traveling in Iraq during and after the rule of Saddam Hussein. She worked in Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Egypt during Desert Storm. She covered the wars in Bosnia and Kosovo, and has worked independently in Tibet, Burma, Kuwait, Argentina, Cambodia, Colombia, and dozens of places in between. Her work has taken her to the Amazon jungles of South America, to Russia, Brazil, India, Somalia, and elsewhere.

As a consultant, she advises organizations operating or contemplating projects in diverse regions of the world, providing political analysis and forecasting.

She is a public speaker on world affairs and the author of "The End of Revolution: A Changing World in the Age of Live Television."

Articles written by Frida Ghitis

World Citizen

Piketty Puts Economic Inequality on U.S. Political Map

By Frida Ghitis
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When a book about economics becomes a No. 1 bestseller, it says as much about society as it does about the book. That’s why the explosive rise of “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” by Thomas Piketty, is so revealing. Piketty’s work, on its own, is an impressive accomplishment. But the fact that it has been welcomed so enthusiastically by such a wide spectrum of the population proves that it has hit a nerve. more

World Citizen: In India Election, Both Gandhi, Modi Weighed Down by Past

By Frida Ghitis
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The sheer magnitude of the elections taking place in India make them historic and worthy of international attention. But even if the contest had more familiar proportions it would still constitute a major event in world affairs. The choice of India’s next leader is sending nervous chills down some people’s spines. The next government in New Delhi will have the power to shake up the world’s largest democracy. more

World Citizen: For Israel-Palestine, a Weak Peace Process is Better Than None

By Frida Ghitis
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From the start of John Kerry’s push for a peace deal between Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for success were dim. Kerry declared confidently he expected a comprehensive deal within nine months. Everyone else responded to his optimism with little more than a benign smile. Eight months later, what the parties have reached instead of an agreement is a deep impasse. The inevitable question arises: What’s next? more

World Citizen: Obama Visit Offers Glimpse Into Saudi Arabia’s Future

By Frida Ghitis
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When President Barack Obama arrived in Saudi Arabia last Friday, he briefly opened a window into the closest circles of power in Riyadh. One of the most striking images was that of Saudi King Abdullah breathing with the aid of an oxygen tank. Although the king appeared animated and energetic, the image of ill health betrayed the urgency of a royal succession process that has already gone into overdrive. more

World Citizen: Venezuela, Once an Ideological Magnet, Now Worries Region

By Frida Ghitis
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The continuing turmoil in Venezuela is being watched with a view toward the national interest in Caribbean and Latin American countries, most notably Cuba, which is feeling the impact of the contest for Caracas with particular intensity. The fall of President Nicolas Maduro and the end of the policies instituted by his mentor, the late President Hugo Chavez, would have strong repercussions in the region. more

World Citizen: Will Catalog of Conspiracies Save Turkey’s Erdogan?

By Frida Ghitis
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Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan is about to find out whether his strategy for quelling an increasingly effective opposition will prove successful and help him secure his place of prominence in Turkey’s future. Erdogan has brandished an eye-popping catalog of conspiracy theories in response to popular protests and a growing corruption scandal. How the public reacts may end his political career. more

World Citizen: Why Qatar Still Loves the Muslim Brotherhood

By Frida Ghitis
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What does a gambler do when a large bet suddenly looks like it’s riding on a losing hand? Many will fold and cut their losses. Others push ahead, hoping their game plan will ultimately pay off. The emirate of Qatar has opted for the second approach in its high-stakes gamble to support the Muslim Brotherhood. With the Brotherhood losing ground after earlier victories, Qatar is sticking with its strategy. more

World Citizen: Russia’s Oil and Gas Are Weapons and Weakness in Ukraine Fight

By Frida Ghitis
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No, this is not a “war for oil,” to cite the old cliche. But behind all the maneuvering in Russia’s conflict with Ukraine and the West, oil and gas reserves and the pipelines that turn them into cash lie in the background, just a step behind the principal action. Russia’s vast hydrocarbon stocks figure into the calculations of the major players, who worry Moscow may deploy them once again as a weapon. more

World Citizen: A Budding Love Affair Between Israel and Latin America

By Frida Ghitis
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The late Venezuelan President Hugo Chavez once tried to insult his country’s next-door neighbor Colombia by calling it the “Israel of Latin America.” But the Colombian president said he found the comparison an honor. Relations between Latin America and Israel are starting to look like a budding love affair, with Latin American countries gaining a valuable economic partner and Israel new diplomatic allies. more

World Citizen: Venezuelan Opposition Tries New Strategy of Confrontation

By Frida Ghitis
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The Venezuelan opposition has shifted gears and is steering down a new path, carrying a message that there is no time to wait for change. The decision to take a more confrontational approach comes in an environment of growing popular discontent, with an accelerating downward economic spiral and increasingly harsh living conditions under the late Hugo Chavez’s hand-picked successor, President Nicolas Maduro. more

World Citizen: As U.S. Ties Flag, Saudi Arabia Plays Pakistan Nuclear Card

By Frida Ghitis
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In the past few months, as the prospects have emerged for an agreement between Iran and U.S.-led world powers on Iran’s nuclear program, Saudi Arabia and nuclear-armed Pakistan have made high-profile moves to strengthen their links in what is most likely not a mere coincidence of timing. The developments recall repeated warnings from the Saudis that if Iran acquires nuclear weapons, Saudi Arabia will, too. more

World Citizen: With All Else Failing, Obama Must Now Act in Syria

By Frida Ghitis
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There are two points of approximate consensus regarding U.S. strategy in Syria. First, the U.S. should not send troops to become directly involved in the fighting. Second, the Obama administration’s current approach to the Syrian conflict is a failure. But if diplomacy has failed and both inaction and direct intervention are not acceptable options, there is still another course of action the U.S. can take. more

World Citizen: U.S.-Saudi Ties Go From Bad to Worse

By Frida Ghitis
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For decades, the foundation of Saudi Arabia’s foreign policy rested on the kingdom’s relationship with the United States. The past three years, however, have brought enormous turbulence to the Middle East, and the Saudis have found Washington’s response increasingly worrisome. Saudi rulers are questioning America’s reliability as an ally and protector and as a result have launched a risky new foreign policy. more

World Citizen: The World’s Most Interesting Presidential Race Starts in Israel

By Frida Ghitis
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The job comes with some nice perks and mostly symbolic duties, but the position, president of Israel, carries enormous prestige, potentially a great deal of influence and, ultimately, a guaranteed spot in the history books. The race to replace Shimon Peres as head of state is getting off to a star-studded start. Already the collection of possible candidates looks like a menagerie of overachievers. more

World Citizen: The Lessons of War That Forged Israel’s Ariel Sharon

By Frida Ghitis
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Before he became the leader of his country, Ariel Sharon, the recently deceased former Israeli prime minister, spent most of his life as a military man. The lessons of war shaped Sharon as a political actor, gradually chiseling the profile of a political leader with such strong and unexpected views that he managed to antagonize even his closest allies and surprisingly satisfy some of his harshest critics. more

World Citizen: How Erdogan Is Losing Turkey

By Frida Ghitis
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Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan stands at the center of a high-intensity feud that is slowly tearing apart the coalition that made him enormously powerful. A corruption investigation reaching into the highest levels of government has revealed a festering feud among rival Islamist groups. Every day brings new revelations involving some of Turkey’s most prominent figures, and each day the stakes grow. more

World Citizen: Long Delayed, Mexico’s Revolution Begins at Last

By Frida Ghitis
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Few countries have claimed for themselves the mantle of revolution as frequently and as fervently as Mexico. Previous efforts brought change, even revolutionary change, but failed to lift large parts of the population out of chronic poverty. That is about to change. Over the past year, Mexico has launched a series of urgently needed but long-delayed fundamental reforms, putting it on the cusp of enormous change. more

World Citizen: Danger of Conflict Along the Israel-Lebanon Border

By Frida Ghitis
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Last Sunday night, a Lebanese soldier opened fire, killing an Israeli sergeant on the Israeli side of the border. The initial reports of an exchange of fire in that area immediately recalled the events of 2006, which started with a cross-border raid and turned into an all-out war between Israel and Hezbollah. While the incident was de-escalated, it highlighted the near certainty that war will eventually return. more

World Citizen: In Egypt, Mixed Constitution Enshrines Military While Advancing Freedoms

By Frida Ghitis
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One year ago, Egyptian liberals took the streets after an Islamist-dominated constitutional assembly approved a draft that many viewed as laying the path to an Islamist state. One year later, with the Islamists out of power and the military firmly in control, a new panel has approved major changes to that constitution. The document offers a window into the long-term aspirations of those holding power today. more

World Citizen: Iran Deal Already Shifting Regional Balance of Power

By Frida Ghitis
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It took just a few days after the agreement between Iran and world powers was announced in Geneva before evidence started to emerge of a significant strengthening of Iran’s position against its rivals. The interim agreement has not gone into effect yet, but the balance of power in the Persian Gulf is already changing, with Arab states worried about what they believe is Iran’s goal of regional dominance. more