Frida Ghitis

Frida Ghitis is a world affairs columnist, author and consultant. Follow her on Twitter at @fridaghitis.

She started her career at CNN, where she worked initially as a show producer, a unit manager for major news operations and later as a producer and correspondent covering mostly international news.

In addition to CNN, her work has appeared in the Washington Post, Chicago Tribune, Philadelphia Inquirer, NRC Handelsblad (Netherlands) and in scores of publications in the U.S., Europe, the Middle East and beyond.

Her regular column on global affairs in the Miami Herald is distributed worldwide by McClatchy-Tribune Information Services. Her weekly WPR column, World Citizen, appears every Thursday.

She has worked in all corners of the world, traveling in Iraq during and after the rule of Saddam Hussein. She worked in Saudi Arabia, Jordan and Egypt during Desert Storm. She covered the wars in Bosnia and Kosovo, and has worked independently in Tibet, Burma, Kuwait, Argentina, Cambodia, Colombia, and dozens of places in between. Her work has taken her to the Amazon jungles of South America, to Russia, Brazil, India, Somalia, and elsewhere.

As a consultant, she advises organizations operating or contemplating projects in diverse regions of the world, providing political analysis and forecasting.

She is a public speaker on world affairs and the author of "The End of Revolution: A Changing World in the Age of Live Television."

Articles written by Frida Ghitis

World Citizen

After Election Victory, Turkey's Erdogan Unlikely to Change Ways

By Frida Ghitis
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Turkish Prime Minister Recep Tayyip Erdogan fulfilled predictions by winning the country’s first direct presidential election Sunday. But rather than putting an end to the divisive political battles that have roiled the country and the inflammatory stance that has strained Turkey’s relations with neighbors, Erdogan’s victory promises to usher in yet another era of contentious domestic and international politics. more

World Citizen

ISIS Victories Over Kurds Demand New U.S. Policy on Iraq

By Frida Ghitis
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Last June, when Iraq’s second-largest city, Mosul, fell to ISIS, the consensus among international observers was that Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki’s sectarian regime had undermined the Iraqi military’s unity, preparedness and willingness to fight. To be sure, Maliki’s governing approach has proved devastating for Iraq, but events of the past few days point to a much more ominous explanation. more

World Citizen

In South Korea, Ferry Disaster Still Claiming Victims

By Frida Ghitis
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Last week, South Korea marked 100 days since the ferry disaster that left 304 people dead, most of them young high school students. The sinking of the Sewol, as the ship was named, has grown into much more than a heartbreaking tragedy. It has become a landmark event in the country’s history. More than anything, the Sewol has transformed the relationship between South Korean citizens and their government. more

World Citizen

In Israel, Pragmatism Could Trump Ideology After the Fighting

By Frida Ghitis
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The domestic political repercussions of a military conflict don’t become clear until the fighting stops. But political tremors don’t wait for a cease-fire. In Israel, the current confrontation with Hamas has fractured a major political alliance and caused one high-level personnel change. But so far there is no indication that Israel’s political landscape will be dramatically transformed by the conflict. more

World Citizen

As U.S. Pivot Stalls, Developments in East Asia Speed Ahead

By Frida Ghitis
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Washington’s famed “Asia pivot” was postponed or at least slowed by the rash of crises in the Middle East over the past few years. But East Asia is not waiting for the U.S. Major countries in the region are actively jockeying for influence, assertively reassessing relations with their neighbors and generally stirring for what could become a significant realignment of power in the world’s fastest-growing region.

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World Citizen

Emotional Bonds, Strategic Interests Link Israel and Iraqi Kurds

By Frida Ghitis
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It is no secret that the survival of Iraq within its current borders is very much in doubt. The battlefield victories of ISIS have revived the debate about a partition of the country into three states: one Sunni, one Shiite and one Kurdish. As Iraqis fret and international observers debate the country’s future, Israelis across the political spectrum have declared their support for an independent Kurdish state. more

World Citizen

In Venezuela, Party Divisions Are Maduro’s Greatest Challenge Yet

By Frida Ghitis
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Venezuelan President Nicolas Maduro has struggled from the moment his mentor, Hugo Chavez, named him as his successor. Maduro faced countless crises: an economy circling the drain, crime rates skyrocketing and huge opposition protests. In recent weeks, the most dangerous of all Maduro’s problems has emerged: a fracturing of support among Chavista loyalists. If Maduro loses his party, he will lose power. more

World Citizen

Kidnapping of Israeli Teens Could Scuttle Hamas-Fatah Deal

By Frida Ghitis
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The abduction of three Israeli teenagers has reawakened enmity between Hamas and Fatah, dormant since a recent reconciliation deal that produced a unity government and called for Palestinian elections to be held within six months thereafter. But the process is now suspended and may come apart. If the kidnapping was carried out by Hamas, it may just turn out to be a milestone mistake for the organization. more

World Citizen

Obama Faces Daunting Choices on Iraq

By Frida Ghitis
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When ISIS launched its blitzkrieg assault on Iraq, it suddenly put the entire country in play, threatening its very existence. The rapid territorial gains by the ultra-extremist Sunni militant group put enormous pressure on the government of Iraqi Prime Minister Nouri al-Maliki. But it is not only Maliki who faces difficult and urgent choices. The Iraqi crisis is also a pressing challenge for Barack Obama. more

World Citizen

Syria Has Put Iraq Back on Obama’s Agenda

By Frida Ghitis
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The news from Iraq was stunning: A group known as the Islamic State of Iraq and Syria managed to take control of Mosul, Iraq’s second-largest city, adding to a growing expanse of territory now under its control. With its victory, ISIS sent a clear message that it has grown into a force that all domestic, regional and international players will have to consider in their strategic and tactical considerations. more

World Citizen

From Spain, a Warning to All Monarchs

By Frida Ghitis
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Spain’s King Juan Carlos, who until recently was beloved by his subjects, announced Monday that he had decided to hand the crown to his eldest son. Tens of thousands of Spaniards swiftly took to the streets to demand a referendum on abolishing the monarchy altogether. Juan Carlos’ fall is a cautionary tale for all royal families seeking to maintain their place by serving as a unifying frame to a democratic state. more

World Citizen

Egypt’s Passion Wanes for Its New President

By Frida Ghitis
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A funny thing happened on the way to the apotheosis of Egypt’s next president: The adoring crowds stayed home. The former military leader, Abdel-Fattah el-Sissi, was supposed to win a landslide victory with support from a public that had given every indication of burning with passion for him. But el-Sissi’s coronation appears less enthusiastic than he had hoped, and that will have implications for his rule. more

World Citizen

India-Israel Ties Set to Blossom Under Modi

By Frida Ghitis
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The electoral earthquake that just shook up India is stirring up great excitement in Israel, where Indian voters’ dramatic move to sweep away the ruling Congress Party and bring to power the opposition is making outsized headlines. By all indications, the victory of the Hindu nationalist Bharatiya Janata Party and its leader, Narendra Modi, is about to rapidly expand ties between Israel and India. more

World Citizen

Putin’s ‘New Cold War’ a Pale Shadow of the Original

By Frida Ghitis
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Tensions between the U.S. and Russia are nothing new, but the growing level of animosity and around Ukraine has ended any remaining illusion that the two powers could develop a partnership, working together without rancor toward common goals on the global stage. But the question that looms even larger than Ukraine, from a geographic and historical standpoint, is whether we have entered a new Cold War. more

World Citizen

What’s Kept Nigeria From Finding the Missing Girls

By Frida Ghitis
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More than three weeks have passed since the terrorist group Boko Haram kidnapped hundreds of girls from a school in Nigeria’s northeast. It took two weeks before international attention turned to the crisis, and even longer for the Nigerian government to sharpen its response. Among the many questions surrounding the attack, one of the most puzzling is why Nigeria failed to react effectively for so long. more

World Citizen

Egypt’s Justice System Goes off the Rails

By Frida Ghitis
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Over decades of authoritarian rule in Egypt, and into the recent years of upheaval, one segment of the state enjoyed a reputation for maintaining a considerable degree of independence. In contrast to much of the governing structure, the Egyptian judiciary was willing to challenge the powerful. Its decisions were guided to a large extent by the concept of rule of law. All that is now a thing of the past. more

World Citizen

Piketty Puts Economic Inequality on U.S. Political Map

By Frida Ghitis
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When a book about economics becomes a No. 1 bestseller, it says as much about society as it does about the book. That’s why the explosive rise of “Capital in the Twenty-First Century,” by Thomas Piketty, is so revealing. Piketty’s work, on its own, is an impressive accomplishment. But the fact that it has been welcomed so enthusiastically by such a wide spectrum of the population proves that it has hit a nerve. more

World Citizen

In India Election, Both Gandhi, Modi Weighed Down by Past

By Frida Ghitis
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The sheer magnitude of the elections taking place in India make them historic and worthy of international attention. But even if the contest had more familiar proportions it would still constitute a major event in world affairs. The choice of India’s next leader is sending nervous chills down some people’s spines. The next government in New Delhi will have the power to shake up the world’s largest democracy. more

World Citizen

For Israel-Palestine, a Weak Peace Process is Better Than None

By Frida Ghitis
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From the start of John Kerry’s push for a peace deal between Israelis and Palestinians, hopes for success were dim. Kerry declared confidently he expected a comprehensive deal within nine months. Everyone else responded to his optimism with little more than a benign smile. Eight months later, what the parties have reached instead of an agreement is a deep impasse. The inevitable question arises: What’s next? more

World Citizen: Obama Visit Offers Glimpse Into Saudi Arabia’s Future

By Frida Ghitis
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When President Barack Obama arrived in Saudi Arabia last Friday, he briefly opened a window into the closest circles of power in Riyadh. One of the most striking images was that of Saudi King Abdullah breathing with the aid of an oxygen tank. Although the king appeared animated and energetic, the image of ill health betrayed the urgency of a royal succession process that has already gone into overdrive. more