Judah Grunstein

Judah Grunstein is World Politics Review's editor-in-chief. His coverage of French and American politics, foreign policy and national security has appeared in World Politics Review, the International Herald Tribune, the American Prospect online, the Small Wars Journal, Foreign Policy online and the Los Angeles Review of Books. He is a regular guest commentator on France 24, as well as a published playwright.

Prior to his journalism career, he spent six years in a small village in Provence, where he learned Provençal building techniques and restored old farmhouses. He has worked as a low-income property manager in Dallas, Texas; as a gang intervention counselor in Santa Cruz, Calif.; and as a nondegreed social worker on New York's Lower East Side. He has traveled and backpacked extensively throughout the United States, as well as in Ecuador. He is a Brooklyn native and the father of an 12-year-old boy.

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Articles written by Judah Grunstein

Diplomatic Fallout: The European Union’s Bait-and-Switch in Ukraine

By Judah Grunstein
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As has become increasingly evident, we live in a Gramscian moment of crisis, where between an old order on its deathbed and a new one not yet born, “a great variety of morbid symptoms appear.” The latest of these symptoms is on display in Ukraine, where Russia’s armed intervention highlights the waning power of the post-Cold War liberal order, even as consensus over what should replace it remains elusive. more

Iran Nuclear Deal a Welcome First Step

By Judah Grunstein
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The agreement signed in Geneva over the weekend by the P5+1 powers and Iran is inarguably good news. If the deal holds, the next six months will be the first time in eight years that Iran’s nuclear program has been slowed for reasons other than technical difficulties and outside sabotage. The agreement is but the first step in what remains an arduous task, but it is a significant and welcome first step. more

In Gaza Operation, Israel Reaffirms an Unsustainable Status Quo

By Judah Grunstein
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By demonstrating a willingness to escalate hostilities regardless of international pressure, Israel has re-established its deterrent with regard to both Hezbollah in southern Lebanon and Hamas in Gaza. The moral implications of this method of deterrence are alarming. The strategic implications are no more reassuring. Israel has successfully defended a status quo that is not necessarily sustainable.
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Obama Must Seize Opportunity for Bolder Foreign Policy

By Judah Grunstein
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As President Barack Obama turns his sights to his second term, he has the benefit of four years of executive experience and is buoyed by the political capital that comes of even the most modest electoral victories. Both could translate into a more determined hand at the helm of the ship of state. But for the Obama administration to solidify what has to date been an uneven record, a number of shifts are necessary. more

To Determine Strategy, U.S. Must Define Its Global Role

By Judah Grunstein
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With the U.S. presidential campaign entering the home stretch, it is evident that foreign policy will not play a major role in the election outcome. Neither candidate has offered a vision of how America should engage with the world to advance American interests in such a way that the benefits are widely shared. In short, how will the U.S. exercise global leadership in a world that increasingly has other options? more

U.S., Egypt Must Manage Strategic-Democratic Disconnect

By Judah Grunstein
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Days after demonstrators stormed the U.S. Embassy in Cairo, Egypt, and the U.S. Consulate in Benghazi, Libya, a wave of anti-American protests has swept through the region. For now, the demonstrations remain limited, and they are likely to fade relatively quickly. Nevertheless, the protests highlight the challenges facing the U.S. as it tries to navigate the changing political landscape of the Middle East. more

Obama's Record: Tactics Trump Strategy in an Age of Constraints

By Judah Grunstein
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As President Barack Obama’s first term in office draws to a close, attention has naturally turned to assessing his foreign policy record over the past four years. And while partisan debates in the run-up to November’s election are certain to feature more caricature than reasoned argument, even nonpartisan observers diverge when it comes to Obama’s foreign policy legacy to date.
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The Political Costs of France's Early Afghanistan Withdrawal

By Judah Grunstein
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Following the death of four French soldiers in Afghanistan on Satruday, French President François Hollande reaffirmed his decision to withdraw French combat forces from the country by the end of 2012. Militarily, the withdrawal of French troops will have little impact on the war effort. But for a number of reasons, it represents an unforced error on the part of the recently elected French president. more

NATO Summit Highlights Europe's Vanishing Global Security Aspirations

By Judah Grunstein
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As is customary for a NATO summit, reports of the alliance's imminent demise will be greatly exaggerated. Nonetheless, the fundamental and persistent questions that continue to dog the alliance cannot be easily dismissed -- not only because of their implications for the future of trans-Atlantic security ties, but also because of what they suggest about Europe's future role as a global power. more

With Europe at a Crossroads, G-8 Returns to Spotlight

By Judah Grunstein
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The importance attached to tomorrow’s G-8 summit vindicates those who defended the G-8 against charges of irrelevance over the past few years. The G-8 was unfairly and prematurely dismissed as a relic from a bygone era. Unfairly, because it continued to address issues that remain outside the G-20’s mandate; prematurely because it remains the most effective trans-Atlantic forum for economic issues. more

Sarkozy's Legacy: Hollande and France's Global Security Role

By Judah Grunstein
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A quick look at French President-elect François Hollande’s agenda in the coming weeks underscores the degree to which foreign policy concerns will weigh upon the early days of his presidency, as well as the questions that remain about his foreign policy orientation. One aspect of Nicolas Sarkozy’s activist legacy is worth noting in this regard: that of national security and defense. more

France's Sarkozy Hemmed In and Vulnerable in Upcoming Election

By Judah Grunstein
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With fewer than 100 days left until the first round of France’s presidential election, President Nicolas Sarkozy is behind in the polls and facing an uphill battle for re-election. Although his principal rival, François Hollande, has been losing ground at an alarming rate, Sarkozy’s numbers have stagnated, and there is no shortage of candidates who might benefit from a protest vote. more